In a large nonstick skillet, heat 3 tablespoons of the oil until shimmering. Add the shallots and garlic and cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Add the pad thai noodles and stir-fry until heated through, about 2 minutes. Add the shrimp and cook, stirring occasionally, until they begin to curl and turn pink, about 2 minutes. Scrape the noodles and shrimp to one side of the pan and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to the empty side of the skillet. Add the eggs and cook, stirring occasionally, until nearly set, about 1 minute. Add the scallions and toss everything together, keeping the eggs relatively intact. Add the fish sauce mixture and stir-fry until the noodles are evenly coated, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer the pad thai to a platter. Top with peanuts, cilantro and bean sprouts and serve with lime wedges.

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Chef Haidar Karoum and restaurateur Mark Kuller (the duo behind Proof and Estadio) always planned to open an Asian restaurant together. After heading east to eat their way through Bangkok and Chiang Mai in 2012, they returned to D.C., where Doi Moi (meaning “new change”) was born. The 5,000-square-foot restaurant overlooks bustling 14th Street and features a large open kitchen paying tribute to the culinary traditions found throughout Southeast Asia—and its Thai dishes are among D.C.’s finest. You’ll agree if you order the khao soi gai, a spicy chicken and crispy noodle coconut curry with pickled mustard greens that takes three hours to make. Tootoomoo Crouch End

Thai Patio does not have the best food on this list. However, it has something that almost nobody else does - an atmosphere that’s essentially the afterparty from the one you just came from. Roll into Thai Patio at 3am on a Saturday night, and you’ll be greeted with 100 other late-night revelers. The order at Thai Patio is always noodles - their drunken noodles (coincidence?) are among our favorite in town. Then sit back, soak up that tequila, and listen to the teenage girl on stage singing an acoustic version of “Man, I Feel Like A Woman”. Jacqueline Kennedy: White House Tour - Documentary Film


The inside of Pure Thai Cookhouse looks like a cross between a country Thai kitchen and a preschool classroom. (That’s a good thing.) The menu here focuses around noodles and stir fries. They’re all great, and the dry noodles with pork and lump crab are an excellent bet. Considering it gets crowded in this very small space, consider flying solo and grabbing one of the stools along the wall. Ruan Thai Restaurant
Since 1992, Gene and Jay Potchana have been satisfying Dallas residents with bright Thai cuisine inspired by Jay’s mother, a cook just outside of Bangkok. Though the husband and wife have reconciled their dishes to tamer Texas tastes, the food is undeniably soothing—as is the restaurant interior, with its soft lighting, Thai art, and wooden screens. Try the tender tulip dumplings stuffed with pork and shrimp and Chiang Mai–style sausages perfumed with basil and lemongrass for proof. Don’t leave without sampling the fried-to-flaky-perfection whole red snapper topped with sauce that’s equal parts sweet and burn. Skillman & Sons Hardware Store London for Padlock and Pocket Tool Tools
This cozy spot in Woodside is charmingly down-to-earth and homey, thanks to the chef and owner Annie Phinphattakul, who presides over both the dining room and the kitchen and employs her teenage children as waitstaff. The food, then, is even more impressive for its sharp perfection — she may be smiling warmly but she is also cooking fiercely: a mix of traditional, mostly northern dishes and her own witty, playful concoctions. Sections of the menu are labeled “Food to Die For” and “Something So Special” and the dishes within them tend to earn these distinctions. The “egg sandwich” — which turns out to be richly sauced, sticky chunks of stir-fried pork, scattered across one shatteringly crispy fried egg and topped with another, plus basil — is the sort of thing you might think about wistfully until you get to eat it again. YumYum Cocktail Competition
Aloy Thai’s menu offers an array of popular Thai favorites that includes everything from meals once made for royalty to appetizers and noodle dishes often found in the carts of street vendors in the kingdom. Harnessing the full-range of Naka dishes, local favorites such as drunken noodles, flavor filled curries and, of course, their ever popular Pad Thai continue to satiate both new visitors and old-time regulars who have come to appreciate the best in South Asian fare.

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