The food at Up Thai isn’t the on the level of the stuff you want to travel for, but on the Upper East Side, it gets no better. Delivery is tempting, but many of the best things won’t travel well (and the dining room isn’t a bad place to spend some time). So DVR that episode of The Bachelorette and get yourself a table. Order the chicken larb, the whole red snapper, and the crispy duck with tamarind sauce. If you’re really into seafood, get a Thai bouillabaisse, which is a thing here.

thai restaurant alexandra palace


Thailand’s food needs little introduction. From San Francisco to Sukhothai, its profusion of exotic flavours and fragrances make it among the most coveted of international cuisines. As a walk through Bangkok forcefully reminds, these flavours and fragrances are seemingly inexhaustible. However, whether it be juicy pieces of grilled pork on a stick or a fiery bowl of ‘Tom Yum’ soup, we all have to start somewhere. And what better place than our carefully selected Top 10 of Thai Food, which spans everything from staple backpacker favourites to Thai classics. Once you’ve tried them all, please vote for the one that really thrilled your taste buds... Ruan Thai Restaurant

One of the traditional takeout things about chicken stir fries is how they have chicken that looks like it was almost shaved, similar to Mongolian Beef in restaurants. The trick to this is to freeze the chicken for about one hour. Once you do you can very easily slice the chicken very thinly against the grain. Since the slices are so thin you’ll find that even though it was in the freezer, it will come back to a good cooking temperature very quickly.
Not coincidentally, Nahm in London is Thompson’s flagship eatery (he recently opened a second location of Nahm in Bangkok. I’ve only been to the one in London). Many Americans are unfamiliar with Thompson since he has no restaurants or TV shows here, but he has probably done more than anyone to spread authentic Thai cooking outside of Thailand, and in addition to winning all sorts of awards and accolades, he wrote the definitive English language Thai cookbook, Thai Food, plus another on street foods of Thailand. When he expanded Nahm to Thailand - a country where he learned to cook, has lived many years of his life, and still spends several months annually in - there was some apprehension over a “foreigner” trying to cook Thai, despite the fact that he had previously helped run a professional academy for chefs there. To doubt Thompson’s abilities based on the fact that he is not Thai is like arguing that Mario Batali can’t cook Italian or Thomas Keller can’t cook French because they are American. Hornsey Carnival in Crouch End

I live in Ellensburg but have been there several times. A friend lives in Cle Elum. I love the food but the service is not always the greatest. I think she hires people without much experience in food service. Sometimes the service is good, other times not so great. I owned a restaurant years ago. There are times when I wanted to get up and just help with serving the tables. I don't think I have ever seen more than one person serving. We have always gone for lunch so it may be different at dinner. Will continue to go back for the food and friendliness.

yum yum thai walthamstow menu


Tried Panang curry and stir fried Mango Paradise. Definitely get the mango dish, very good. Properly cooked vegetables were crisp and flavoursome, sauce amazing. The Panang curry is more coconut milky spicy curry sauce than anything else, so be prepared to eat a lot of rice with that one. I liked it, just know what you are in for with the curry option.
A great Thai restaurant and also a sports bar? Count us in. Hoy-Ka has established itself as one of LA’s finest not only because of their excellent food, but also for having a space that’s different from everyone else’s. The wood-covered interior feels kind of like a tavern, and with plenty of TVs playing sports, you won’t have any trouble finding a reason to drink. The pad ka prao, with its fried egg-topped tower of white rice, is your order.
An incredibly popular ‘one plate’ dish for lunch or dinner, fried basil and pork is certainly one of the most popular Thai dishes. It is made in a piping hot wok with lots of holy basil leaves, large fresh chilli, pork, green beans, soy sauce and a little sugar. The minced, fatty pork is oily and mixes with the steamed white rice for a lovely fulfilling meal. It is often topped with a fried egg (kai dao) you will most likely be asked if you would like an egg with it. Be aware that most Thai people ask for lots of chilli in this dish so if you are not a fan of tingling lips, ask for you pad krapow ‘a little spicy’.

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This ethnic grocery’s teeny kitchen specializes in palate-awakening heat. Choose among five spice levels (from “mild” to “1,000 peppers”), and make any necessary adjustments at the table stocked with fiery condiments. The choices here include bowls of kee mao (rice noodles spiked with basil, cherry tomatoes, and chili sauce); preserved duck egg curry; and shredded papaya salad with crab, made Thai style (sweet and sour with peanuts, dried shrimp, and cherry tomatoes) or Laos style (meaning with galvanic bursts of southern Thai fish sauce). Most dishes ring in under $8, making Asia Market’s homespun setting all the more satisfying. The Great Gildersleeve: Birdie Sings / Water Dept. Calendar / Leroy's First Date
Isaan Classic is the newest spot on this list, but the Silver Lake joint’s Northern Thai menu is different and fantastic and you need to be eating there right now. Located on the ground floor of a Comfort Inn (right by the swiveling Foot Clinic sign), Isaan Classic is where you go to try something new. The papaya salad with dried shrimp and salty egg, the fermented pork sausage, and deep fried crab rolls are all must-orders, but you need the green curry noodles most. Thai Street Food Michelin Star - GIANT CRAB OMELET at Jay Fai (ร้านเจ๊ไฝ) in Bangkok, Thailand!

The stiff competition of the local tom yum wars makes it exceedingly difficult for any restaurant to stand out here, and in other New York neighborhoods Ploy would be a blessing. It’s spare but nice, if oddly decorated (see alternating succulents and lightbulbs), and some waitresses might take to, say, playing through the entirety of Britney. The restaurant is most notable for its noodles, stir-fried and otherwise, like rad nar, served in a bowl with Chinese broccoli and a generous helping of thick, sweet gravy speckled with fermented soy beans, the whole lot of which would be right at home at a neo-diner. The stir-fried rice noodles in the guay tiew kua gai are satisfyingly chewy and served well by the crispy egg, chicken, squid, and — an essential addition — sriracha hot sauce. Most famous are the pan-fried pad kee mao, which here taste pure and smoky. Always, though, supplement your noodles with a few appetizers, like the bracing miang kana, broccoli leaves served with shredded pork and a mix of diced chiles, ginger, rind-on lime, and more.

thai east finchley


I made this recipe sans the lentils portion (we wanted to use up other veggies in the fridge) and thought it was very tasty! I followed the meatball portion of the recipe to a T, but I left the mixture in the fridge for a full 2 days because I didn't have time to cook up the meatballs. My husband said these are the best turkey meatballs he has ever eaten. We weren't blown away by the yogurt sauce...after trying it, we added some sauteed garlic and shallots for some additional flavor. Overall, a solid recipe and I'd recommend giving it a try.

thai takeaway e17


You’ve no doubt passed Siam Sunset a hundred times and just assumed it was a closed down portion of the adjoining America’s Best Value Inn. But it’s very much open and home to the best traditional Thai breakfast in town. Open every day at 6am, this is where you go to eat some porridge and Thai donuts, sip on some instant coffee with angry old men, and feel like you are nowhere near Southern California.

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In a wok or large stockpot, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the garlic and stir-fry 15 seconds. Add the shrimp and stir-fry 2 to 3 minutes or just until pink and opaque. Add the tofu and toss until lightly coated with oil. Add the eggs and scramble. Fold in the softened noodles, fish sauce, vinegar, 1/4 cup water, brown sugar, and paprika and toss for about 2 minutes or until well combined. Add the scallions and bean sprouts and heat through. Pile onto a large platter and garnish with the red pepper, peanuts, and wedges of lime. Yumyum, Stoke Newington - Gordon Ramsay
This dish literally translates to “red light stir fried morning glory.” The red light refers to the flames that leap up while cooking this dish on a wok, as well as the red Thai chilis that freckle the dish. Morning glory is a relatively neutral tasting veggie, so this dish dresses it up in a fermented soy bean, oyster sauce, and soy sauce gravy. Eat this with a bowl of rice porridge for a filling Thai breakfast. Yum Yum
Having received rave reviews for their east-end pop up two years ago, Chef Andy Oliver and business partner Tom George found a permanent location for Som Saa just down the road from Spitalfields Market. Som Saa, in an airy, former warehouse with exposed brick, has a buzzy atmosphere and hurrah, despite being on the edge of hipster Hoxton, the music is very cool but not too loud. We opted for the tasting menu which proved to be an excellent choice with mu hong, a southern style soy braised pork belly, as one of the highlights.
Opened in 2006, this family-owned North Loop restaurant revered for its pad kee mao (stir-fried rice noodles with basil, mushrooms, and Thai chile) recently reopened after an 11-month hiatus and renovation, and it’s better than ever. Chef Ek Timrerk’s presentation of Thai’s four regional cuisines (from northern jungle curry to central massaman curry) alongside fusion dishes, like fried lemongrass chicken wings, debunks the myth that Thai food needs to be spicy. But all dishes are still bursting with flavor, which explains the inevitable line wrapping around the no-reservations restaurant. The perfect finish: mango sticky rice. Ruan Thai Restaurant
I made this recipe tonight. It had a great taste. I added 1/8 cup of peanut butter for a slightly more peanut buttery taste. Overall, this was spot on regarding taste. It had a great taste, but a few tips for others that may not be as avid chefs (like me). I am not necessarily the best cook, so this reminder is worth it. DO NOT OVERCOOK! The rice noodles are easy to become mush (I have not cooked with them before and the ones I had really should only have been cooked 1 minute and sat 3 for a firmer noodle – they ended up as mush for me because I waited 5 1/2 minutes). I added snow peas and baby corn, but I overcooked those too (yikes – I am such a rookie) because I wanted to cook the sauce items and had already added all the ingredients when I started adding the sauce ingredients. I feel like the sauce items should be mixed together first and heated before adding the noodles, shrimp and tofu, so it cooks properly / blends/heats, but maybe that is just because I wasn’t using a real wok (I don’t have one, so I used a large sauté pan. Overall the flavors were excellent, just would have changed my technique / sequence a bit. It moves pretty quickly once you start cooking so be prepared. Thanks for the recipe. I will definitely get it down next time. Yum Yum Sab - Thai Restaurant
A prawn dish of gung pao nahm phrik mapraow, was a first course with an unexpected kick to it at the end. A green papaya salad with beans, peanuts and tomatoes was a refreshing touch between the spicier courses. To finish, salted palm sugar ice cream may not sound like anything special but this is one of the best desserts in the city, in both Thai and non-Thai restaurants. Fantastic, authentic food, great service and ambience, Som Saa deserves all its accolades and repeat visits from all Thai food lovers.

The food at Up Thai isn’t the on the level of the stuff you want to travel for, but on the Upper East Side, it gets no better. Delivery is tempting, but many of the best things won’t travel well (and the dining room isn’t a bad place to spend some time). So DVR that episode of The Bachelorette and get yourself a table. Order the chicken larb, the whole red snapper, and the crispy duck with tamarind sauce. If you’re really into seafood, get a Thai bouillabaisse, which is a thing here.
The name means "drunken noodle." It's a dish Thai street vendors sell to tipsy party-goers, and it's also Leah Cohen of NYC's Pig and Khao's pick for a satisfying late night meal. Like Laad Naa, this dish is made with wide rice noodles. "They're similar to Chow Fun noodles," explains Cohen: "Spicy, sweet, and salty, with Chinese broccoli, eggs, onion, meat, chiles, garlic, soy, fish sauce… a little oyster sauce." In other words: A little bit of everything. This dish is saucy and sticky and indulgent, which makes it ideal for both sopping up too much booze and for random Tuesday nights after a long day of work. WOW Simply Japanese a Restaurants in London serving Japanese Food
As I’ve mentioned a few times, I’ve been really taking it easy lately in the kitchen. When I say take it easy, I don’t mean making ten minute basil artichoke toasts and five minute magic green sauce. I mean taking it easy as in NOT COOKING ANYTHING. We’re talking life-saving dinner made by friends, hot dogs (gulp), mac and cheese, and chicken nuggets out of the freezer. During these last few weeks, my old self has definitely been food-snob-judging my current self. If nothing else, this experience has shown me that my ideals for cooking and feeding kids have some work to do in terms of aligning themselves with reality. London Thai Restaurant | Thai Cuisine London | Blue Lagoon
This Rainbow Vegetarian Pad Thai (with peanuts and basil dohhh) is just really good, my friends. It is really good and surprisingly easy. I took a few ideas I had seen out there in the big wide internet world (vegetables as noodles! Pad Thai sauce-ery!) and made them into this. And I am so happy with how it turned out + the minuscule amount of effort it takes to get there. Pandan Leaf
Most vegetarians would be pretty angry if they found out after eating that their meal contained fish sauce. I would personally consider it on par with using chicken/beef broth. I’ve seen a recipe for vegetarian fish sauce (http://veganmiam.com/recipes/vegan-fish-sauce) and I’ve personally just swapped it out for low sodium soy sauce or a touch of miso in other recipes.
Toast offers a popular point of sale system for restaurants that also includes an online ordering system. This option is most suited to the restaurants that already use Toast POS. The whole system is meant to work together to help restaurants manage all of their operations in one system, to even include online order reports and delivery systems. Pricing starts at $140 per month. 

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If a restaurant’s focus is northern, expect vegetables, bitterness, and earthy, oily flavors like coconut curry (khao soi), along with heaps of sticky rice. Northeastern (or Isan) tends to be tarter and spicier; order the larb (a spicy minced meat salad) and fermented sausages. Southern Thai is all about pungent, bold curries spiked with turmeric, while central prioritizes balance, best exemplified by traditional pad thai, made with tamarind, lime juice, dried shrimp, and salted turnip or radish—never ketchup or peanut butter, swaps made to satisfy America’s penchant for sugar. BEST THAI RESTAURANT IN AMERICA - Lotus of Siam in Las Vegas
In a large nonstick skillet, heat 3 tablespoons of the oil until shimmering. Add the shallots and garlic and cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 3 minutes. Add the pad thai noodles and stir-fry until heated through, about 2 minutes. Add the shrimp and cook, stirring occasionally, until they begin to curl and turn pink, about 2 minutes. Scrape the noodles and shrimp to one side of the pan and add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to the empty side of the skillet. Add the eggs and cook, stirring occasionally, until nearly set, about 1 minute. Add the scallions and toss everything together, keeping the eggs relatively intact. Add the fish sauce mixture and stir-fry until the noodles are evenly coated, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer the pad thai to a platter. Top with peanuts, cilantro and bean sprouts and serve with lime wedges.

thai food east finchley


Chef Haidar Karoum and restaurateur Mark Kuller (the duo behind Proof and Estadio) always planned to open an Asian restaurant together. After heading east to eat their way through Bangkok and Chiang Mai in 2012, they returned to D.C., where Doi Moi (meaning “new change”) was born. The 5,000-square-foot restaurant overlooks bustling 14th Street and features a large open kitchen paying tribute to the culinary traditions found throughout Southeast Asia—and its Thai dishes are among D.C.’s finest. You’ll agree if you order the khao soi gai, a spicy chicken and crispy noodle coconut curry with pickled mustard greens that takes three hours to make. chilli basil thai food cardiff restaurant
Stopped here with friends after a Sunday hike. The first thing I noticed was the prices which seem a little on the high side for Cle Elum. No matter. We sit and order Tom Yum soup as a starter. Server warns us about the spice levels. We order our entrees. Food took a while to come out, and Tom Yum did not come as a starter, but instead with the entrees. Service was pleasant but erratic; we had to ask for place settings, and several times for more water. The Tom Yum was actually good, but a little too spicy. Unfortunately, our entrees were SO spicy that the flavor was completely overpowered! And the food was very greasy and slightly odd - too many onions in my 3* fried rice; strangely long carrot strips on my friend's 4* pad thai. I only ate about half of my fried rice; my friend ate one bite of her pad thai. My other friend finished his 2* mango chicken only out of sheer hiker hunger. We paid, left, and went across the street to Dairy Queen for chicken strips and a burger. As much as I wanted to like this place (and for there to be options in Cle Elum), we will not be back and I will not be recommending it to others. I don't think ordering zero stars would help. Oh - and we were discussing openly (not rudely, just matter of fact) how the food was unpleasantly spicy and the owner came out and glared at us, not cool.

yum yum restaurant stoke newington


Although today we associate Pad Thai sauce with tamarind, in this authentic southern-Thai recipe, the sourness comes instead from a combination of rice vinegar and lime juice. Several hundred years ago, traditional Pad Thai was made in just this way—without tamarind—and versions of this original recipe can still be found in various regions of Thailand. Simply Thai, Teddington - Gordon Ramsay
This is a favorite in my family, and for good reason. It’s a fried rice dish that’s been tossed together with kapit -- fermented ground shrimp and salt -- until the aromatic shrimp paste coats the entirety of the rice. Unlike typical fried rice dishes that are studded with meats and veggies sauteed all together, khao kluk kapit’s accompaniments are served as a myriad of toppings: sour, unripe mango, sweet Chinese sausage (the best addition in any fried rice), shallots, chilis, thinly sliced omelette, dried shrimp, and marinated pork. This makes for a dish that is equally colorful as it is delicious, and no two bites are the same.

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Step One is a choice of pasta; Angel Hair, Spaghetti, Fettuccine, Linguini, Penne, Cheese Tortellini, Cheese Ravioli Meat Ravioli. Step two is a choice of pasta sauce; Spicy marinara, Regular marinara, Alfredo sauce, Alla vodka sauce (pink sauce) and step three is choice of salad dressing; House Italian, Ranch. For an additional cost add add meat the meal; Meat Balls $2, Meat sauce $2, Italian Sausage $2, Grilled Chicken $3, Grilled Shrimp or Salmon $5. Coffee Circus Ltd Cafe in London for Coffee, Tea and Cakes
This longstanding Lynnwood restaurant's “secret” Thai menu (available only in Thai language) is where diners will find kuay teow rhua (boat noodle soup) and goong pad sataw: shrimp with cluster beans (aka petai or stink beans). Also fantastic is pad gra pow, made here with holy basil and ground pork or, by request, “moo grab” style with crispy pork belly topped by a fried egg.
Even papaya salad gets the fine-dining treatment at Uncle Boons, no surprise when you consider the restaurant’s husband-and-wife team (Matt Danzer and Ubon-born Ann Redding) hail from Per Se. Armed with a charcoal grill and rotisserie (no small feat in Manhattan), Danzer and Redding turn out smoky seafood plates with nam prik (Thai chile sauce). The crowd at this art-cluttered tavern is as varied as the menu, which is admittedly regionally unfocused, though it consists mostly of Redding’s family recipes. So it’s not uncommon for traditional massaman curry punctuated with green peppercorns (a drier version than you’re likely used to) and titillating lamb larb to simultaneously hit the table with unconventional mee krob with fried sweetbreads. Don’t leave without knocking back a Singha slushy—they sell 600 a week. Pandan Leaf Thai Restaurant in London UK serving Pad Thai and Salad
Lum Ka Naad in Northridge might be a bit of a hike, but it’s worth it. The modern restaurant has a big menu, but you’re narrowing it down to two sections: “Northern Cuisine” and “Southern Cuisine.” These are the dishes specifically from the owner’s home regions, and they are incredible. Start with the turmeric shrimp soup from the South and work your way up to the kang ho in the North (essentially drunken noodles with vegetables in a curry rub). Delicious food and a geography lesson. Everyone wins. London Good Street Food. Thai Restaurants in Camden Market, Camden Town
Like Ayada, Chao Thai has settled comfortably, but not passively, into its role as a standard-setter for Elmhurst’s Thai scene. The owners opened a larger second location nearby, but it closed after a few years, reportedly because the chef went back to Thailand. It’s a decade into its run, but there’s still no liquor license — not such a bad thing when you can BYOB your favorite beer — and the dining room is still a tight wedge of a space. But who cares when the service is so warm (if still a bit hesitant about serving spicy or funky dishes to outsiders) and the food is this good? Ayada is where you go when you’re in the mood for curries; Chao Thai is the spot for Thai-style salads. The papaya salad is bright, refreshing, and not too hot; a lemongrass salad packed with chopped chiles, limes, and nuts is punchy and invigorating. Whatever you do, don’t sleep on the yam pla-duk fu, a salad of firm-fleshed young mango (or sometimes green papaya) with a lime dressing and ground catfish that’s been deep-fried into crunchy, wispy bits of fish. It’s one of Queens’ most thrilling dishes. Chao does have range beyond Thai-style salads. To begin, there’s crispy pork belly with Chinese broccoli and oyster sauce, and khao kha moo, that famous Bangkok street dish of stewed pork leg over rice. Here, the gravy is lip-smackingly thick, the tender meat best dipped in the nam pla prik that comes with it, and the rice fluffy.

yum yum thai stoke newington

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