People flock to Pok Pok for the legendary chicken wings: they’re deep fried, smothered in sticky fish sauce, and make up more than 30 percent of the restaurant’s sales. But they stay for the coriander-rubbed grilled boar collar—and the whiskey. James Beard Award–winning chef Andy Ricker may be a 6-foot-2 white dude from Oregon, but his ever-expanding empire (seven restaurants in Portland and New York at last count) and fluency in Thai suggest his food holds its own with the Siamese. The original Pok Pok started as a bare-bones shack with a single-digit menu. Today, the expanded restaurant emphasizes northern and northeastern Thai street food, complete with an arsenal of Chiang Mai sausage, fiery buffalo larb, spicy green papaya salad, and coconut curry grilled corn. CHOMPED by a GECKO!


Crying Tiger is a tiny take-out window a few feet off of Hollywood Blvd. and, at first glance, seems like another decent drunk food option for everyone stumbling out of the bars. But Crying Tiger is much, much more. First off, it’s operated by the Luv2Eat people, so expect flavors and spice to be intense. Secondly, their menu goes far beyond a solid bowl of pad thai. Think spinach-based jade noodles, shu mai dumplings, and crispy chicken skin. If you feel like sitting down, hop inside the bar next door at Black Magic Rose where the full Crying Tiger menu is also available.

London has had decent Thai restaurants for decades, with menus dominated by Thailand's national dish, Phad Thai and green or red curry. These dishes are great but recently there's been an explosion of Thai street food and more unusual options available across the city, in posh restaurants, cafes and hipster joints. With Bangkok frequently topping lists of the best street food cities in the world, Londoners are fortunate to have such an excellent range of places to enjoy one of the world's favorite cuisines. Here are five of the best.

thai restaurant north finchley


Diehard Thai fans make the pilgrimage to Issaquah’s Noodle Boat partly because Noodle Boat workers make the pilgrimage to Thailand annually, researching new dishes and making authentic chili paste to bring back to Seattle. Playfully named dishes like Queen of Banana, King of Garlic, Hot Meat, and “Whatever You Called?” can bring on serious heat by request. Recommended: BKK — Noodle Boat’s version of hor mok (curried fish custard), which is stir-fried rather than steamed.

nid ting thai holloway road


Jira Hurapan Chef "Jett's" wife, is the pastry chef at Songkran. Pastry Chef Jira prepares everything in-house from scratch and only with the freshest of ingredients. Jira creates and continuously experiments with new desserts. She uses fresh lychees, jackfruit, taro root, tapioca, bananas, and mangoes. She creates homemade sorbets, ice cream and at times makes her popular hand-crafted truffles.

thai restaurant wood green

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